“If we cannot make revival happen, we can at least stop hindering it!”

~ Wolfgang Simson, Houses that Change the World, page 104.

Originally posted on Prayer In Every City:

DSC03563Many people in America are praying for revival, but we have not seen it happen. These people are fervently praying the right verses so why does revival tarry? After studying past revivals and spiritual awakenings, I have learned of a missing key to revival. Yes, we have to fervently pray, but is that enough? Let’s take a look at some scriptures in the Bible. One of the key verses which revival preachers during the First and Second Great Awakenings is found in Hosea.

“Sow for yourselves righteousness; Reap in mercy; Break up your fallow ground, For it is time to seek the LORD, Till He comes and rains righteousness on you” Hosea 10:12 (NKJV).

Let’s break this verse down to see what must be done for revival to come to America.

Sow for yourselves righteousness
Revival always begins with prayer. In order to have revival, we must pray for individuals…

View original 719 more words

Amy_Carmichael_with_children2

Father, hear us, we are praying,
Hear the words our hearts are saying,
We are praying for our children.

Keep them from the powers of evil,
From the secret, hidden peril,
From the whirlpool that would suck them,
From the treacherous quicksand pluck them.

From the worldling’s hollow gladness,
From the sting of faithless sadness,
Holy Father, save our children.

Through life’s troubled waters steer them,
Through life’s bitter battle cheer them,
Father, Father, be Thou near them.

For the rest…

“God does nothing but by prayer, and everything with it.”

~ John Wesley

 

 

Leslie Ludy

“If you don’t pray often, you won’t gain a love for praying. Prayer is work, and therefore it is not very appealing to our natural sensibilities. But the simple rule for prayer is this: Begin praying and your taste for prayer will increase. The more you pray, the more you will acquire the desire for prayer, the energy for prayer, and the sense of purpose in prayer.”
Leslie Ludy, Wrestling Prayer

Oswald Chambers

“Don’t forget to pray today because God did not forget to wake you up this morning.”
Oswald Chambers, My Utmost for His Highest Journal

Metro Prayer for August 15, 2014

The FBI reports that Omaha is one of the worst cities for human trafficking. There are at least two thousand people in Nebraska who are forced to work as prostitutes according to research from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. “The thing about people who are traffickers, the predators, they are very adept at psychological mind games,” said Linda Burkle with the Salvation Army’s Wellspring Program which helps victims of human trafficking. “Most of the young ladies I have worked with that were trafficked did not see themselves as being trafficked. This was their boyfriend, this was the love of their life. They would do anything for him…” “In many cases, the woman feels so vulnerable and feels so afraid she doesn’t go and rat out the man in charge, she’s afraid he’s gonna beat her up or that’s the person who feeds her,” said Nebraska State Senator Amanda McGill. Please pray for deliverance for the young women and men who are trapped in prostitution. Ask the Lord for insight and wisdom for those in law enforcement as they investigate these cases. “The LORD has heard my supplication, The LORD receives my prayer. All my enemies will be ashamed and greatly dismayed; they shall turn back, they will suddenly be ashamed.” Psalm 6:9, 10

Pray for the pastors in the Metro area. Pastors often endure many trials, which have the effect of wearing them down and distracting them. Lift them up to the Lord for strength, protection from attacks from the enemy. Also pray for a fresh infilling of the Holy Spirit. Pray that the trials that they are experiencing will only serve to mold them into the image of the Lord —1 Peter 1:6 “In this you greatly rejoice, though now for a little while you may have had to suffer grief in all kinds of trials. These have come so that your faith–of greater worth than gold, which perishes even though refined by fire–may be proved genuine and may result in praise, glory and honor when Jesus Christ is revealed.

“I have but one passion – it is He, it is He alone. The world is the field and the field is the world; and henceforth that country shall be my home where I can be most used in winning souls for Christ.”  ~ Count Zinzindorf

 

“History confirms the truth that wherever evangelical and vital religion flourish, there lives
the earnest gatherings for social prayer.”

~ J. B. Johnston, The Prayer Meeting and Its History

Some today view journaling as a sentimental token of a bygone age. For others, it’s a distraction from getting things done amid our frenetic pace of life.

As one who has kept a journal for many years, journaling has been an invaluable means of grace in my Christian walk and a practical discipline with many benefits.

Here are seven quick reasons I commend the practice.

1. To keep a record of life’s journey.

In journaling one can remember the mundane, recall the funny, and not forget the humbling, painful, formative events of life. Pete Hamill, in his introduction to Edward Robb Ellis’s diary, explains: “The diarist has one essential goal: to freeze time. . . . This day will never come again, but here, in this diary, I will have it forever.” Likewise, diarist Andi Ashworth reminds us that with a journal “we have a notebook in which to be a student of life.” It’s one thing to remember the general contours of life, but a whole other thing to remember with specificity the dialogue, the smells, the laughs, and the tears.

Download / By Aleksi Tappura

2. To have a tangible account of God’s blessings.

We do not want to be like Israel and “forget” the Lord and all he’s done (e.g., Judg. 8:34; Ps. 106:21;Hos. 8:14). One of the beauties of corporate worship is coming together as God’s people to recite what God has done. D. A. Carson is right: “Believers who spend no time reviewing and pondering in their minds what God has done, whether they are alone and reading their Bibles or joining with other believers in corporate adoration, should not be surprised if they rarely sense that God is near.” Journaling is another means of “pondering what God has done,” of tangibly recording his unwarranted grace in my life. The words you write will either serve to spur you on toward greater faithfulness or will be a haunting reminder of an ungrateful life.

3. To serve as a reminder of the long-term sanctification process.

We all need constant reminders that we don’t become holy overnight; it takes time and holy sweat (cf. Phil. 2:12–13; 1 Tim. 4:15). Many know of Jonathan Edwards’s 70 resolutions and imagine a life of continual Edwardsean highs, but few realize how often he wrote of deep discouragement and defeat. George Marsden notes that Edwards “record[ed] many days of lows, ‘decays,’ and lengthy times of inability to focus on spiritual things.” In Edwards’s Diary we glimpse an honest picture: “I find by experience that, let me make resolutions, and do what I will . . . it is all nothing, and to no purpose at all, without the motions of the Spirit of God.” Edwards learned to depend on God’s grace. Journaling can serve as a mirror: it reminds us of resolutions we’ve made and broken, and how desperately we need God’s enabling grace to obey and honor him.

4. To aid in prayer and meditation.

Focused, meditative reading can be difficult in our age of texts, tweets, and posts. After reading two or three pages of an article or book, Nicholas Carr admits, “I get fidgety, lose the thread, begin looking for something else to do. I feel as if I’m always dragging my wayward brain back to the text. The deep reading that used to come naturally has become a struggle.” Journaling allows you to slow down and focus your thoughts, to unplug and disconnect as you pray and meditate on the Scriptures.

5. To practice the writing craft.

In his book Outliers Malcolm Gladwell popularized the notion that it takes about 10,000 hours to become an expert in any field. While there are obvious qualifiers and exceptions to this rule, it reminds us writers that there’s no better way to improve than by writing. Whether you desire to write for a public audience or simply for writing’s sake, keeping a journal is a wonderful way to fine-tune the writing craft.

6. To keep a collection of odds and ends.

In journaling you can save quotes, articles, even undeveloped thoughts, and use them for a future sermon, lecture, or article. Though I’ve shifted some of this benefit on to Evernote in recent months, journaling is still my favorite means of collecting odds and ends of my own writing. You can track your thinking, see how it develops over time, and have the benefit of having your thoughts on paper. John Piper, summarizing Augustine, says it well: “I count myself as one of the number of those who learn as they write and write as they learn.”

For the rest of the post…

“Revivals begin with God’s own people; the Holy Spirit touches their heart anew, and gives them new fervor and compassion, and zeal, new light and life, and when He has thus come to you, He next goes forth to the valley of dry bones… Oh, what responsibility this lays on the Church of God! If you grieve Him away from yourselves, or hinder His visit, then the poor perishing world suffers sorely!”

~Andrew Bonar

August 2014
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